Finnair Brings Back Flights to Nagoya; Updates Its Winter '24 Traffic Programme'

Publish Time:2023-11-09 09:48:12Source:Travel Daily News

【Introduction】:Finnair will start two weekly frequencies to Nagoya, Japan, on 30 May 2024. Finnair is also updating its winter 2024 traffic programme and adding flights to the British Isles, Iceland and leisure destinations in Portugal and the Canary Islands.

Finnair will start two weekly frequencies to Nagoya, Japan, on 30 May 2024. Finnair is also updating its winter 2024 traffic programme and adding flights to the British Isles, Iceland and leisure destinations in Portugal and the Canary Islands.

"We are delighted to resume our connection to Nagoya, where we used to fly before the pandemic. We already fly to Tokyo Haneda and Narita, as well as Osaka. In the summer season of 2024, we'll have a total of twenty weekly frequencies to Japan," says Ole Orvér, Chief Commercial Officer at Finnair.

"We will also have a very compelling leisure offering to popular holiday destinations for the winter season of 2024," Orvér continues.

From October 2024, Finnair will begin scheduled flights to three of its former charter destinations. There will be two weekly frequencies to Faro in Portugal and Lanzarote and Fuerteventura in the Canary Islands.

Finnair will also start operating two popular leisure destinations with widebody aircraft. There will be three weekly incremental frequencies to Dubai with the Airbus A330 aircraft. Las Palmas flights will be operated with the Airbus A350.

Finnair is also adding more flights to the British Isles for the next winter season. Manchester will get five additional weekly frequencies, and Dublin and Edinburgh will both get two additional weekly frequencies. All these flights will connect seamlessly with Finnair's flights to Northern Finland, Scandinavia and Japan.

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